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Sunday, May 04, 2008
Through the looking glass...

Curtain-twitchers beware. After seeing Gregory Crewdson's photographs, you might think twice before spying on your neighbours for fear of what you might see. Crewdson's interest lies predominately within the American suburbs and small-town life, and what lies beneath the surface of the seemingly ordinary. His photos initially might make you think they're stills from a David Lynch film, but they're actually the results of highly-elaborate staged set productions.

Crewdson examines the backdrop of American life at twilight and at night - hours when the strings tying down the cover of normalcy come undone, and the fantastical emerges with the darker side of suburbia.The eerie images are so enthralling and unsettling because of the disturbing events which take place in such familiar settings. When I first saw them, my mind immediately went to Edward Hopper's paintings of American life, and the alienated drifters that featured in them. Crewdson's photographs also seem to uncover the stifled feelings of the people occupying these spaces of everyday banality, and are additionally intriguing because while they seem filmic, there's no narrative grounding these images implying a past and a future, instead there is a suspended moment of possibility.

Currently exhibiting at White Cube until May 28.

Untitled, Twilight

Untitled, Twilight

Untitled, Twilight

Untitled, Twilight

Untitled (Ophelia), Twilight

Untitled, Beneath the Roses

Untitled, Beneath the Roses

Untitled

Untitled (Boy with Hand in Drain)

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